Who We Are

Theme 1: Observations

Sarmiento, Jorge
(609) 258-6585 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
George J. Magee Professor of Geosciences and Geological Engineering, Princeton University | C-SOBOM Director
Interests Oceanic cycles of climactically important chemicals such as carbon dioxide and use of chemical tracers to study ocean circulation.
Biography

Jorge Sarmiento has published widely on the global carbon cycle, on the use of chemical tracers to study ocean circulation, on the impact of climate change on ocean biology and biogeochemistry, and on the role of the Southern Ocean in determining the air-sea balance of carbon dioxide. He has published over 170 journal articles and is co-author, along with Nicolas Gruber, of the graduate textbook Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, published by Princeton University Press - the textbook has sold over 3,000 copies.

Dr. Sarmiento has demonstrated leadership  in the scientific planning and execution of a wide range of community-wide research activities, including the Joint Ocean Global Flux Study (JOGFS) during the 1990s and early 2000s, as well as the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program of the 2000s. He has more than 30 years of experience managing scientific research grants of approximately $1.5M per year for his own group. He has been Director of the Princeton University Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program for many years, and is also the founding Director of the Princeton/GFDL Cooperative Institute on Climate Science, which was established in 2003, whose annual expenses are approximately $3M.

Dr. Sarmiento will serve as Director of the C-SOBOM project. He and his research group will be directly involved in data analysis, model analysis and metric development, as well as high resolution biogeochemical modeling.

Bender, Michael
(609) 258-2936 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of Geosciences, Princeton University | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Ocean carbon cycle and paleoclimate
Biography

Michael Bender's ocean biogeochemistry research centers on development and application of natural tracer approaches to study ocean carbon fluxes. These methods have included the use of isotope ratio mass spectrometry to characterize changes in the atmospheric O2N2 ratio at remote observing sites, studies of the triple isotope composition of O2 in the euphotic zone to constrain rates of gross photosynthesis by marine ecosystems, and the continuous measurement of surface water O2/Ar ratios to constrain net community production and carbon export over a 1-2 week window. This work has given insights into variations of, and controls on, ocean carbon fluxes in space and time. Recently, Bender's group, working with N. Cassar (Duke), has developed an instrument for high precision continuous measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon in surface waters. In paleoclimate, Bender's work has focused on applying measurements of the isotopic compositions and relative concentrations of O2, N2, and Ar to developing high-accuracy timescales for events recorded in polar ice cores.

Dr. Bender will conduct collaborative studies of the carbon and nitrogen cycle in the Southern Ocean as part of C-SOBOM's ship-based observational program.

Cornuelle, Bruce
(858) 534-4021 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Director of the Physical Oceanography Research Division, Scripps Institute of Oceanography | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Applying data analysis, inverse methods, and data assimilation to infer the large-scale ocean circulation.
Biography

Bruce Cornuelle is a researcher oceanographer and senior lecturer at Scripps Institute of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. His research interests focus on applying data analysis, inverse methods, and data assimilation to infer the large-scale ocean circulation.

Dr. Cornuelle will advise on the data assimilation component of the C-SOBOM research program.

Dickson, Andrew
(858) 822-2990 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of Marine Chemistry, Scripps Institute of Oceanography | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Seawater carbon dioxide chemistry: its analysis and thermodynamics
Biography

Andrew Dickson is a leading expert in seawater carbon dioxide chemistry. His laboratory provides certified reference materials for seawater CO2 measurements. These reference materials are used by nearly 300 laboratories around the world to calibrate measurements for total alkalinity, total dissolved inorganic carbon, and pH. Dickson's other research aims to characterize the thermodynamics of acid-base processes in seawater systems, to measure CO2 levels in the ocean, and to research further into causes of ocean acidification.

Within C-SOBOM, his laboratory will be primarily involved in the analysis of pH and other CO2 parameters in the waters of the Southern Ocean. These measurements will be used to ensure high-quality calibration of the proposed profiling pH floats, and should enable correlation algorithims to be developed between various hydrographic parameters and the CO2 levels that will enable C-SOBOM to obtain a detailed picture of CO2 distributions in the Southern Ocean.

Gille, Sarah
(858) 822-4425 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of Oceanography, Scripps Institute of Oceanography | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Climate trends and air-sea exchange in the Southern Ocean, using satellite and in situ observations, including Argo data.
Biography

Sarah T. Gille has worked extensively on evaluating the the physical processes that govern climate in the Southern Ocean.  She brings to this project extensive experience in using both satellite data and Argo floats to study the Southern Ocean.  She also has been active in the multi-institutional US/UK Diapycnal and Isopycnal Mixing Experiment in the Southern Ocean and in an interdisciplinary project focused on the impact of iron limitation on biological productivity in southern Drake Passage (both funded by NSF).

Ito, Takamitsu
(404) 894-3985 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Assistant professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Georgia Institute of Technology | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Biogeochemistry, ocean circulation and climate
Biography

Taka Ito is an oceanographer interested in climate and biogeochemistry of the Earth’s ocean-atmosphere system, which he studies through observational data analysis and the development of conceptual and numerical models of key biogeochemical processes. Recent funded projects include investigations of dissolved gases such as carbon dioxide, oxygen and noble gases involving interactions across different scales, and using innovative theoretical approaches to improve numerical simulations and to interpret observed phenomena. He received his PhD from MIT in 2005, and is now an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology.

He will serve as a Theme I Co-Investigator to perform adjoint sensitivity analysis, which is an important step towards assimilation of biogeochemical datasets into high-resolution models.

Johnson, Kenneth
(831) 775-1985 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Senior Scientist, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute | Associate Director, Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Development of chemical sensors and sensor networks and application of the data to understanding global biogeochemical cycles
Biography

Ken Johnson is an ocean chemist whose work focuses on the development of novel chemical sensors, autonomous platforms, and the application of the data that these systems produce to understand global biogeochemical cycles.  He has developed long endurance, in situ sensors for a variety of chemicals, including nitrate and pH.  These have been made widely available to the ocean community through partnerships with ocean instrumentation companies.  He has authored more than 100 papers based on these instruments and the data they produce.   He has been Chief Scientist on numerous cruises, including the Southern Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiment (SOFEX), which demonstrated the role of iron in regulating primary production in the Southern Ocean. Ken Johnson also served as Chair from 1994 to 1998 of the University National Oceanographic Laboratory System (UNOLS), which coordinates the operations of the 25 largest academic research vessels.  He is currently Chair of the Ocean Time Series Advisory Committee.

Dr. Johnson will serve as Associate Director of C-SOBOM and his research group will assemble and calibrate the nitrate and pH sensors used in this work and participate in data analysis and outreach.

Mazloff, Matthew
(858) 534-3236 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Programmer/Analyst IV , SIO-UCSD | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Producing and analyzing estimates of the ocean state
Biography

Matthew Mazloff has been producing and analyzing a Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) for over 6 years.  This observation–model synthesis is distributed via server (sose.ucsd.edu) and has a large international user community. Research using the SOSE has spanned a broad range of topics including papers on air-sea heat fluxes, the carbon cycle, the ocean circulation, and the dynamical balances governing this circulation.  The SOSE effort contributes to ongoing development of the 4D-Var assimilating version of the MIT general circulation ocean and sea-ice model.

Mazloff will lead the data assimilation component of the C-SOBOM research program.  Mazloff is developing a state estimate of the California Current System (CCS) that includes biogeochemistry as part of the NASA Carbon Monitoring System effort. Using knowledge gained from this CCS state estimate, C-SOBOM biogeochemistry observations will be assimilated into the SOSE.  The goal will be to maximize the information content of individual C-SOBOM observations by synthesizing them with a general circulation model and developing a best estimate of the current state, including biogeochemistry, of the Southern Ocean.

Riser, Stephen
(206) 543-1187 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of Oceanography, University of Washington | Theme 1 Co-Lead
Interests The nature of the large-scale ocean circulation, the interaction of physical and biogeochemical aspects of the circulation and their relationship to the carbon cycle and climate, and the development of new technological methodologies that can be used to make quantitative measurements of these effects.
Biography

Stephen C. Riser, Professor of Oceanography at the University of Washington in Seattle, has long-term interests in the interactions of physical and chemical aspects of the circulation of the large-scale ocean.   His published works on these topics generally have used observations from subsurface floats to infer physical and geochemical properties of the ocean circulation.   Some of this work dates from the days of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), where he was a member of the US WOCE Scientific Steering Committee. During the past decade he has been heavily involved in the international Argo program and has served as a member of the International Argo Steering Team.   He also serves as a member of NASA’s Aquarius Science Team, studying the freshwater balance of the ocean and air-sea interactions very near the sea surface. His present work is focused on the use of profiling float technology in studying the global ocean circulation, and his laboratory at UW has built and deployed over 1400 floats in the past decade in support of these studies.   His laboratory has pioneered the use of many of the technologies presently used in modern profiling floats, including the addition of biogeochemical sensors, under-ice technology, and the use of Iridium communications.  At UW he has recently taught graduate courses on both the Physics of Ocean Circulation and Climate Dynamics.   During the 2012-2013 academic year he will direct (in conjunction with several other UW faculty members) a group of 15 undergraduate students on a month-long expedition in the western North Pacific aimed at understanding the relationship between the circulation in the Kuroshio Extension and the drawdown of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into the ocean in the region.

Dr. Riser will serve as co-Leader for Theme I in SOBOM, and his group at the University of Washington will have the primary responsibility for fabricating and deploying the profiling floats that will form the observation basis for the work of C-SOBOM.

Sabine, Christopher
(206) 526-6800 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Director, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests Understanding the global carbon cycle, the role of the ocean in absorbing CO2 released from human activity, and ocean acidification
Biography

Christopher L. Sabine is director of NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, WA. He also holds an affiliate faculty position in the University of Washington School of Oceanography and is a senior fellow at the UW/NOAA Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Oceans (JISAO). Sabine received his PhD. in chemical oceanography from the University of Hawaii in 1992. Since that time he has published over 100 journal articles and book chapters on carbon cycling. His current research focuses on understanding the global carbon cycle, the role of the ocean in absorbing CO2 released from human activity, and ocean acidification. He has been a scientific advisor for a number of national carbon programs in the U.S. and internationally. He has won several awards including the U.S. Department of Commerce Gold Medal Award for pioneering research leading to the discovery of increased acidification in the world’s oceans and was NOAA’s research employee of the year in 2009 for leadership. He is currently a coordinating lead author for working group 1 of the IPCC 5th assessment report, Chapter 6: Carbon and other Biogeochemical Cycles. For more information go to: http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/co2/

Dr. Sabine will work with C-SOBOM scientists to optimize the observing systems and will help evaluate scientific results.

Sigman, Daniel
(609) 258-2194 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Dusenbury Professor of Geological and Geophysical Sciences, Princeton University | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Using stable isotopes of nitrogen to study the modern and past biogeochemistry of the ocean, with a focus on polar regions.
Biography

With new isotopic methods developed in his laboratory, Daniel Sigman is tracking the transformations of biologically available nitrogen in the modern ocean and reconstructing climate-associated changes in ocean biogeochemistry and circulation in the past, especially over ice age cycles. His focus is on the polar oceans, the Southern Ocean in particular, and the roles of these regions in the glacial/interglacial cycle in the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide.

Dr. Sigman will contribute to the interpretation of the nitrate observations arising from C-SOBOM, in part by complementing key observations of depth, spatial, and seasonal variation with targeted nitrogen isotopic constraints. Sigman will also investigate the paleoclimate implications of the C-SOBOM observations.

Speer, Kevin
(850) 645-5625 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of EOAS and Director of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Institute, Florida State University | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Large-scale circulation of the ocean.
Biography

Kevin Speer's research is a mix of observation and analysis aimed at improving our understanding of ocean circulation and transport processes. His work focuses on deep currents and polar circulation, and flow forced by diverse buoyancy sources including air-sea fluxes, hydrothermal or geothermal sources. Current research deals with Southern Ocean overturning and its relation to air-sea fluxes and eddy transport mechanisms. Ongoing projects include the direct observation of circulation with subsurface floats, tracer inversion techniques, and near-coastal observation studies. Studies of transport mechanisms for mass, heat, salt, and other properties are the fundamental motivation for these experiments and studies.

Dr. Speers’ role in C-SOBOM is to help understand the physical context for ocean carbon cycle processes, to carry out ship-based field measurements, and to deploy instruments to observe properties and circulation in the Southern Ocean.

Talley, Lynne
(858) 534-6610 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Distinguished Professor, Scripps Institute of Oceanography | Theme1 Lead
Interests The general circulation of the ocean and the role of various physical oceanic and atmospheric conditions that affect ocean currents and property distributions, including salinity.
Biography

Lynne Talley focuses on the general circulation of the ocean and the role of various oceanic and atmospheric conditions that affect ocean currents and property distributions.  Her research involves collection and analysis of data from most of the world’s oceans, including the Southern Ocean, relevant to the movement and evolution of heat, freshwater, and water masses, and the formation of water masses, in the context of the underlying ocean dynamics.  In addition to numerous publications, she has published a widely-used graduate level textbook on descriptive physical oceanography, and two oceanographic atlases. Her research and international/national committee work include a focus on ocean climate variability/change. She has played a leadership role in scientific planning and execution of international programs, including the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) of the 1990s and the CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program of the 2000s to present, and is a Lead Author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (AR4 and AR5) chapters on ocean observations.  Dr. Talley is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Meterological Society, the American Geophysical Union, and the Oceanography Society.

Dr. Talley will serve as Leader of the C-SOBOM observational program (Theme 1) and her research group will be involved directly in float, hydrographic and satellite data analysis, interfacing with the Southern Ocean State Estimate and data-model comparisons.

Verdy, Ariane
(858) 534-9662 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Assistant Research Oceanographer, Scripps Institution of Oceanography | Theme 1 Co-Investigator
Interests Mathematical and numerical modeling of marine ecosystems to study patterns of spatial and temporal variability that result from the interplay of biological and physical processes.
Biography

Ariane Verdy is an Assistant Research Oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. She has a bachelor's degree in physics engineering from the University of Montreal, Canada, and a PhD in physical oceanography from the MIT-WHOI Joint Program. Her research interests include biogeochemistry, physical-biological interactions, and theoretical ecology. Currently, her work focuses on data assimilation of biogeochemical observations in high-resolution models, with application to the California Current Ecosystem. She is a member of the NASA Carbon Monitoring System science team, and leads an interdisciplinary effort to improve the simulation of air-sea CO2 fluxes in climate models.

Dr. Verdy's role in C-SOBOM will be to advise the development of the biogeochemical component of the Southern Ocean data assimilation, evaluate the model-observation consistency, and analyze the solution to obtain estimates of air-sea fluxes, biogeochemical cycling, ocean acidification, and ecosystem productivity.

Wanninkhof, Rik
(305) 361-4379 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Oceanographer, NOAA Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests The oceanic inorganic carbon cycle with a focus on the anthropogenic perturbation thereof
Biography

Rik Wanninkhof is an oceanographer at the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory of NOAA in Miami FL, USA.  He studies the oceanic inorganic carbon cycle with a focus on the anthropogenic perturbation thereof.  He has done extensive research on the transfer of carbon dioxide across the air-water interface.  He research portfolio is comprised of several sustained observations projects including:

a. Measurements of partial pressure of CO2 from ship of opportunity funded by the Climate Observation Division NOAA Climate Program Office.  He leads the effort that involves PI’s from four different institutions and 14 ships of opportunity, making it the largest consolidated effort in the world. The focus is on characterization surface water CO2 levels and sea-air CO2 fluxes.

b. GOship repeat hydrography that detects changes in anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean and natural and climate induced variability on decadal time scales by repeat occupations of global ocean transects.  The effort is funded by the Climate Observation Division NOAA Climate Program Office.

c. Coastal Ocean Acidification Monitoring of Gulf Coasts and East Coast. This new program utilizes moorings, ships of opportunity, and research cruises to characterize the ocean acidification trends along the East and Gulf Coast. The effort is sponsored by the NOAA Ocean Acidification Program.

Wanninkhof will participate in C-SOBOM as an external collaborator.

Theme 2: Modeling

Sarmiento, Jorge
(609) 258-6585 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
George J. Magee Professor of Geosciences and Geological Engineering, Princeton University | C-SOBOM Director
Interests Oceanic cycles of climactically important chemicals such as carbon dioxide and use of chemical tracers to study ocean circulation.
Biography

Jorge Sarmiento has published widely on the global carbon cycle, on the use of chemical tracers to study ocean circulation, on the impact of climate change on ocean biology and biogeochemistry, and on the role of the Southern Ocean in determining the air-sea balance of carbon dioxide. He has published over 170 journal articles and is co-author, along with Nicolas Gruber, of the graduate textbook Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics, published by Princeton University Press - the textbook has sold over 3,000 copies.

Dr. Sarmiento has demonstrated leadership  in the scientific planning and execution of a wide range of community-wide research activities, including the Joint Ocean Global Flux Study (JOGFS) during the 1990s and early 2000s, as well as the U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program of the 2000s. He has more than 30 years of experience managing scientific research grants of approximately $1.5M per year for his own group. He has been Director of the Princeton University Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program for many years, and is also the founding Director of the Princeton/GFDL Cooperative Institute on Climate Science, which was established in 2003, whose annual expenses are approximately $3M.

Dr. Sarmiento will serve as Director of the C-SOBOM project. He and his research group will be directly involved in data analysis, model analysis and metric development, as well as high resolution biogeochemical modeling.

Delworth, Thomas
(609) 452-6565 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Group Leader, Climate Change, Variability and Predictability, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests The development and use of global climate models for the study of decadal to centennial climate variability and change, with emphasis on the role of the ocean in the climate system
Biography

Dr. Thomas Delworth is leader of the Climate Change, Variability and Predicition Gropu at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) in Princeton, New Jersey, where he has been a research scientist since 1984. Dr. Delworth's research focuses on climate variability and change on the time scales of decades to centuries, with emphasis on the role that the Atlantic ocean plays in climate. Dr. Delworth has extensive experience in the development and application of global coupled ocean-atmosphere climate models, especially with regard to the role of the ocean in the climate system. Some of Dr. Delworth's recent work has focused on the development of a high resolution global climate model that includes an eddy-resolving (0.1 degree resolution) ocean component. Dr. Delworht has served on numerous national and international scientific research committees, has been a contributing author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and has authored over 80 papers for scientific journals and books.

Dr. Delworth will collaborate with the modeling component of the SOBOM project, particularly with regard to the use of eddy-resolving models to study the impact of wind changes on the Southern Ocean.

Dunne, John
(609) 452-6596 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, GDFL/NOAA | Theme 2 Co-Investigator
Interests Climate, ocean biogeochemical and ecological modeling, geochemical tracer studies of carbon cycling, and ocean instrument development.
Biography

John Dunne is an oceanographer with 20 years of experience developing instruments, collecting field observations, and performing analysis and modeling studies of ocean carbon cycling and the climate system. He has led GFDL's ocean carbon modeling activities, and has co-led GFDL's Earth System Model Development Team adapting GFDL's models for coupled carbon-climate studies and participating in CMIP5. He has received grants from NASA and NOAA and trained 2 post-docs, 3 summer undergraduates, and assisted in the training of undergraduates, graduate, and postdocs at Princeton University (J. Sarmiento, M. Bender, B. Ward) and Duke University (S. Lozier). As a U. Washington postdoc with A. Devol and S. Emerson, Dr. Dunne coordinated a team of 10 individuals to develop and implement the Oceanic Remote Chemical Analyzer. He has published 47 journal articles.

In addition to his research activities, Dr. Dunne has served GFDL as co-author of its 2011 5-10 year strategic science plan, 2010 report on a potential move to Princeton's main campus, and a 2006 five-year model development strategic plan, as well as serving as GFDL's contact for NOAA's efforts in ecological prediction, ocean fertilization, and ocean acidification.

Dr. Dunne will be primarily involved in C-SOBOM's high-resolution biogeochemical modeling.

Feely, Richard
(209) 526-6214 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
NOAA Senior Fellow, Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests Carbon cycling in the oceans and ocean acidification processes
Biography

Dr. Richard Feely is the group leader of the Ocean Carbon Gropu at the NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory in Seattle, WA. He has more than forty years of experience working with large-oceanographic data sets for the study of long-term changes in the ocean carbon system. He is the co-chari of the U.S. CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program, and has published more than 220 peer-reviewed publications on teh carbon cycle in the oceans, including his most recent research on ocean acidification processes in the South Pacific, including the Southern Ocean.

For the C-SOBOM project, Dr. Feely will continue his research on the development of algorithms for DIC, pH, and aragonite and calcite saturation for use with the ARGO float data in order to study temporal changes in the ocean carbon parameters.

Ferrari, Raffaele
(617) 253-1291 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Breene M. Kerr Professor of Physical Oceanography and Director of Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology | Theme 2 Co-Investigator
Interests The role of oceanic and atmospheric turbulence in climate and climate change.
Biography

Raffaele Ferrari studies the dynamics of the ocean circulation and its role in shaping climate and climate change. A major thrust of his research is to understand how ocean eddies, the equivalent of atmospheric storms, affect the ocean circulation and ocean biological productivity. He is a leading PI of three observational programs, one in the Southern Ocean and two in the North Atlantic, focused on measuring the rate at which eddies mix carbon dioxide and heat into the ocean. From 2003 to 2008, he led a multi-institution US Climate Process Team to improve the representation of ocean dynamics in climate models. He is the Director of the MIT Program in Atmospheres, Oceans, and Climate.

As part of C-SOBOM, Dr. Ferrari and his research group will run and analyze high resolution simulations of the Southern Ocean, paying particular attention at model-data intercomparisons.

Gnanadesikan, Anand
(410) 516-0722 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Associate Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences , Johns Hopkins University | Theme 2 Co-Lead
Interests Numerical modeling of the role of Southern Ocean winds and eddies in determining the large-scale overturning and biogeochemical structure of the ocean; impacts of circulation changes on oceanic ecosystem structure and biological function
Biography

Anand Gnanadesikan joined the Morton K. Blaustein Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University as an Associate Professor in 2011. For the fifteen years preceding, he occupied a series of research positions at Princeton University and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Lab. While at GFDL, he helped direct the Ocean Model Development Team which was responsible for constructing new climate models, served as director of graduate studies for the Atmosphere and Ocean Sciences program, and received a Department of Commerce Bronze Medal for outreach work on the Sant Ocean Hall. Dr. Gnanadesikan has published widely on the role of Southern Ocean winds and eddies in determining the large-scale overturning and biogeochemical structure of the ocean. His current research is focused on understanding how coupled changes in ocean-atmosphere circulation result in changes in oceanic ecosystem structure and biological function, and how to robustly represent such changes in numerical models. He has also been involved in helping develop new models that couple ocean circulation to ice shelves.

Dr. Gnanadesikan will serve as the Co-Lead of the Modeling Theme of C-SOBOM, participating in the design of the SOMIP experiment and focusing using the biogeochemical metrics developed by the floats to constrain both biological and physical processes in the models.

Griffies, Stephen
(609) 452-6500 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Physical Scientist, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests Studies of the ocean climate, physical ocean processes, and numerical ocean modeling.
Biography

Stephen Griffies' research interests include (1) understanding the ocean's role in the global climate system through the use of theoretical analysis and numerical modeling; (2) formulating physically and mathematically sound parameterizations and analysis

tools for describing and simulating various physical ocean processes; (3) contributing to the intellectual basis of ocean climate modeling as a rationally based scientific endeavor; (4) studying climate predictability and variability, particularly that related to decadal and longer time scales. His work has led to the publication of roughly 60 articles, including numerous reviews, as well as the monograph "Fundamentals of Ocean Climate Models" (Princeton University Press, 2004). Dr. Griffies was a founding member of the international CLIVAR Working Group for Ocean Model Development and served as its co-chair from 2004-2009. He is presently a member of the CLIVAR/CliC/SCAR Southern Ocean Region Implementation Panel.

Dr. Griffies is the leader of the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) project, with MOM used at GFDL and internationally for studying global and regional climate. His main role in the SOBOM will be in the development of high resolution ocean and climate model configurations, as well as the analysis and interpretation of model simulations.

Hallberg, Robert
(609) 452-6508 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Oceanographer, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests Development of numerical models of ocean circulation, particularly isopycnal coordinate models; Southern Ocean dynamics; ocean physical process parameterization; ocean / ice-sheet interactions
Biography

Robert Hallberg is an oceanographer and the head of the Ocean and Ice-sheet Processes and Climate Group at NOAA’s Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. He is the primary developer of the "Generalized Ocean Layer Dynamics" (GOLD) model, which is the physical ocean component of GFDL’s ESM2G Earth system model. He has extensive experience in developing mechanistically consistent parameterizations of climatically important small-scale physical processes related to dense-water overflows, eddy/mixed-layer interactions, and internal-wave driven diapycnal mixing through his involvement in three ocean Climate Process Teams.

Through the project Modeling Eddies in the Southern Ocean (MESO) and related studies, Dr. Hallberg has examined the role of transient eddies in the dynamic and watermass balances in the Southern Hemisphere, and in regulating the Southern Ocean’s response to forcing changes. He has recently initiated a project to couple high-resolution global ocean models with Antarctic and Greenland ice-sheet models via dynamically reshaped ice-shelves, to explore the role of ocean/ice-sheet interactions in sea-level rise and in ocean watermass formation.

Dr. Hallberg will collaborate in the Modeling Theme of C-SOBOM, developing appropriate high-resolution global ocean models, analyzing the dynamics of the Southern Ocean as revealed by these models, and improving their representation of small-scale physical and biogeochemical processes as motivated by comparison with the observations.

Juranek, Lauren
(541) 737-2368 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Assistant Professor of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University | Theme 2 Co-Investigator
Interests Dissolved gases, isotope biogeochemistry, marine biological pump, and marine carbon cycle
Biography

Laurie Juranek’s research falls into two basic categories: 1)  understanding the role of the biological pump in regulating ocean CO2 uptake using in situ measurements of geochemical tracers such as dissolved gases, gas ratios and gas isotopes, and 2) predicting and quantifying the impact of climate- and CO2- related changes to biogeochemical cycling. She actively seeks to incorporate novel research methods, technologies, and platforms to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of field-based observations in the coastal and open ocean.

Dr. Juranek’s role in the SOBOM project will be to use high quality hydrographic data to develop empirical algorithms for prediction of carbon system parameters like pH, total CO2, and total alkalinity. These algorithms can then be used to validate high-resolution coupled model outputs and constrain the full carbon system from profiling float data.

Kamenkovich, Igor
(305) 421-4108 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Associate Professor, University of Miami | Theme 2 Co-Investigator
Interests Large-scale ocean circulation, mesoscale eddies, their interactions and importance in climate
Biography

Igor Kamenkovich has been doing research on ocean dynamics and its role in the Earth climate, focusing on the large-scale ocean circulation and mesoscale eddies. He has more than 20 years of experience working on these topics. The Southern Ocean, with its thermohaline circulation and mesoscale eddy field, represents one of the main topics in his research.  In his studies, he is striving to combine numerical simulations (both idealized and comprehensive), theory and observations. He has experience in managing scientific research grants and supervising graduate students and postdoctoral investigators.

Dr. Kamenkovich will serve as a Researcher in the C-SOBOM project and will be involved in the analysis of Observation System Simulation Experiments (OSSE), studies of the importance of eddies in heat/carbon distributions, model analysis and metric development.

Marinov, Irina
(254) 898-1014 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Assistant Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Pennsylvania | Theme 2 Co-Investigator
Interests Feedbacks between the physical climate system, the ocean carbon cycle and ocean ecology.
Biography

Irina Marinov is an Assistant Professor in the Earth & Environmental Science Department at University of Pennsylvania. At Penn, she has been building the university’s first oceanography group, teaching Climate Change and Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics, and actively promoting oceanography and climate science on campus and the Philadelphia community. Her research is at the frontier of ocean biogeochemistry, ocean ecology and physical oceanography and combines theoretical aspects with running climate change simulations in complex General Circulation Models. She works to improve our understanding and prediction of:

- Oceanic uptake, storage and release of CO2; oceanic controls on atmospheric CO2 and global climate from seasonal to millennial time scales.

- Climate-sensitivity of ocean biogeochemical cycles and interactions with the ocean ecosystem structure;

- Feedbacks between the physical climate system, ocean carbon cycle and ocean ecology.

Much of her background and interests are related to the critical role of the Southern Ocean in carbon uptake and storage.

Dr. Marinov and her research group at Penn will be involved in the C-SOBOM effort to develop data/model metrics and in assessing the community model simulations

McClean, Julie
(858) 534-3030 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Research Oceanographer, Scripps Institute of Oceanography | External Collaborator
Interests Fine resolution Earth System numerical modeling.
Biography

Julie L. McClean is a Research Oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California San Diego. Her publications report results from emerging realistic fine resolution numerical simulations, at first from stand-alone global ocean models and later from ocean models coupled to thermodynamic/dynamic ice or in an Earth System framework. As new in-situ and remotely sensed observational data sets of the ocean and sea-ice have become available, she has utilized them to both assess the realism of the simulations and to better understand ocean and sea-ice processes depicted by the data and models. Her focus has expanded to understanding the importance of air/sea/sea-ice interactions on scales not resolved in current climate models.  Dr. McClean has participated in review boards, proposal panels, federal agency planning workshops, and has chaired and co-chaired thematic meetings.

Dr. McClean’s contribution to SOBOM will be to investigate the Southern Ocean meridional overturning circulation and circumpolar transport when mesoscale eddies are largely explicitly resolved, together with the associated poleward eddy heat fluxes and their impact on sea-ice off Antarctica.  For the past 14 years she has maintained a small team supported from extramural funds to carry out these resource-demanding model runs and their subsequent analyses.

Russell, Joellen
(520) 626-2194 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Associate Professor of Geosciences, University of Arizona | Theme 2 Lead
Interests The ocean’s role in climate and the use of Earth System Models and global coupled climate models to study it.
Biography

Joellen L. Russell, Associate Professor of Geosciences at the University of Arizona, received her bachelor's degree at Harvard University in Environmental Geoscience before earning her Ph.D. at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD in Oceanography. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Arizona in 2006, she worked at Princeton University at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory during the intensive preparations for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fourth Assessment. Prof. Russell’s work there on the westerly winds led to her greatest research accomplishment so far: the creation of a new paradigm in climate science, namely that warmer climates produce stronger westerly winds. This insight solved one of the long-standing climate paradoxes, the mechanism responsible for transferring one-third of the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere into the ocean and then back out again during our repeated glacial-interglacial cycles. She continues active collaboration with the GFDL Earth System Model and Climate Model Development Teams, and is currently serving as a member of the U.S. CLIVAR Office, Process Studies and Model Improvements Panel. Prof. Russell won the UA Provost’s Teaching Award in 2010 while successfully teaching introductory oceanography to over 1000 undergraduates in a single class, the most popular science class on campus. Prof. Russell is one of the 14 scientists behind an amicus curiae brief supporting the plaintiff in the historic U.S. Supreme Court decision on carbon dioxide emissions and climate change, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, et al. v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. In 2011, the American Association of Petroleum Geologists appointed her a Distinguished Lecturer.

Prof. Russell will serve as Lead of the modeling component (Theme 2) of the SOBOM project. She and her group will be directly involved in development of the observationally-based metrics, in analysis and assessment of the ultrahigh resolution coupled climate models and Earth System Models, and in the development of a Southern Ocean Model Intercomparison Program.

Stouffer, Ronald
(609) 452-6576 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Head of Climate and Ecosystem Group, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests Climate: past, present, and future.
Biography

Ronald J. Stouffer is a senior research climatologist and group head of the Climate and Ecosystems Group at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), Princeton, NJ. Stouffer is one of the leading climate modelers in the world, and uses complex numerical models to study and predict the behavior of the earth's climate system. Because of his scientific contributions to climate research over the past two decades (over 120 papers), he has been a central contributor to the first four Working Group 1 assessment reports from the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) and has been a chapter author for the 1995, 2001 and 2007 reports. He is also a member and chair of the World Climate Research Program (WCRP) Coupled Model Intercomparison Panel (CMIP). He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society and also a Penn State Alumni Fellow. Stouffer along with Manabe first showed that the Southern Ocean will play a large role as climate changes. He has co-authored a number of cutting edge papers highlighting the important physical processes in the Southern Ocean.

For the C-SOBOM program, Dr. Stouffer is organizing a Southern Ocean Model Intercomparison project (with Russell and Danabasoglu) and will participate directly in data analysis, model analysis and metric development, and high resolution bigeochemical modeling.

Winton, Michael
(609) 452-6531 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Oceanographer, NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory | External Collaborator
Interests The role of air-sea fluxes in climate change, particularly in polar and subpolar ocean regions.
Biography

Michael Winton’s work is focused on the simulation of the ocean's role in transient climate sensitivity and is directed toward understanding the causes of model differences. He is the main developer of the GFDL sea ice model and was a co-leader of the team that developed GFDL's CMIP5 climate models. He is also the head of GFDL's Climate Processes and Sensitivity group , which has primary responsibility for the CM2.6 climate model. This high-resolution model incorporates an eddy resolving (1/10 degree) ocean component. CM2.6 will play a role in the SOBOM model analysis component.

Theme 3: Education, Diversity, and Outreach

Cullen, Heidi
(609) 986-1986 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Chief Climatologist, Climate Central | Theme 3 Co-Lead
Interests Climate change and the environment, energy issues, climate science communication and education
Biography

Dr. Heidi Cullen serves as Chief Climatologist for Climate Central — a non-profit science journalism organization headquartered in Princeton, NJ. She is a Visiting Lecturer at Princeton University and a Senior Research Fellow at the Wharton Risk Management and Decision Processes Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Cullen is the author of The Weather of the Future published by Harper Collins. Before joining Climate Central, where she reports on climate and energy issues, Dr. Cullen served as The Weather Channel’s first on-air climate expert and helped create Forecast Earth, a weekly television series focused on issues related to climate change and the environment. Prior to that Dr. Cullen worked as a research scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, CO. She received the NOAA Climate & Global Change Fellowship and spent two years at Columbia University’s International Research Institute for Climate and Society working to apply long-range climate forecasts to the water resources sector in Brazil and Paraguay. She is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the American Meteorological Society and the Society of Environmental Journalists. Dr. Cullen also serves as a member of the NOAA Science Advisory Board. She received a Bachelor of Science degree in Industrial Engineering from Columbia University and went on to receive a Ph.D. in climatology and ocean-atmosphere dynamics at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University.

Dr. Cullen will serve as the Theme Lead for the EDO portion of the C-SOBOM project. The focus of her project will be on informal education and outreach.

McDonnell, Janice
(848) 932-3285 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
4-H Science Agent and Associate Professor, Department of 4-H Youth Development, Rutgers University | Education/Diversity/Outreach Manager, Theme 3 Co-Investigator
Interests Developing strategies for achieving high quality collaborations among scientists and educators to promote Ocean Literacy.
Biography

As 4-H Science Agent in the Department of 4-H Youth Development and Director of the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence Networked Ocean World, Janice McDonnell facilitates collaborations among scientists and formal and informal educators to create unique products and programs that promote Ocean Literacy.  Janice has played a key role in the development of curriculum that uses scientific data in innovative teaching contexts at Rutgers University for K-12 students. She also works on the connections between in and out of school science learning and has played an integral role in the evaluation of education programs.

Ms. McDonnell will serve as the Education and Diversity Coordinator for C-SOBOM and as a Co-Investigator for Theme 3.

Perry, Deborah
(312) 986-1134 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Director of Selinda Research Associates, Inc., Selinda Research Associates | Co-Investigator, Education and Outreach Evaluator
Interests Intrinisic motivation and its role in the development and facilitation of meaningful informal learning experiences in out of school settings.
Biography

Deborah L. Perry has been Director of Selinda Research Associates since 1989.  With a background in Instructional Systems Technology, she has conducted research on the role of intrinsic motivation in informal educational settings. Her work includes evaluating out-of-school educational visitor experiences in venues such as museums, zoos, aquaria, national parks, and science centers.  She presents workshops and consults with museums and other informal learning settings on visitor-centered long-range and interpretive planning, including how to incorporate research-based instructional development principles into the design of intrinsically motivating informal learning and visitor experiences. Author of the recently published book “What Makes Learning Fun? Principles for the Design of Intrinsically Motivating Museum Exhibits” (2012), she has developed a knowledge hierarchy technique for assessing learning in informal settings, a strategy to map the intersection of audience’s learning with the educational goals of the program. This technique has been used in projects across the United States, and in Canada, the UK, and Australia. Before founding Selinda Research Associates, Dr. Perry served for seven years as an elementary school media specialist in Klamath Falls, Oregon, integrating technology into previously print-based school libraries.

Dr. Perry will serve as the external evaluator for the educational and outreach efforts of the SOBOM project. She and her research team will plan the evaluation efforts, gather and analyze educational outcome and impact data, and present the findings to inform the field and future projects.

Schofield, Oscar
(848) 932-3265 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Professor of Oceanography, Rutgers University | Theme 3 Lead
Interests Applying new technologies to understand how ocean food webs are structured by the ocean physics and chemistry.
Biography

Oscar Schofield is a Professor of Biological Oceanography at Rutgers University interested in how plankton dynamics structure marine food webs and feed back on the ocean’s biogeochemistry.  His research focus has combined genetics and biochemistry with the development of new ocean observing technologies (satellites, radars, and autonomous underwater vehicles).  He is co-Director and co-Founder of the Coastal Ocean Observation Laboratory (COOL), which has become a technology and research group of 5 faculty and a team of over twenty technicians and students.  The COOL group has been awarded and managed over fifty million dollars in competitive awards from NOAA, Office of Naval Research, Department of Homeland Security, NASA and the National Science Foundation over the last 20 years.  Dr. Schofield’s research efforts have focused on polar and temperate waters with extensive efforts in the Southern Ocean, with ongoing research along the West Antarctic Peninsula and the Ross and Amundsen Seas. The group has also focused on integrating the research into innovative education and outreach efforts spanning K-12 to undergraduate students and the general public.

Dr. Schofield will serve as the Clo-Lead for Theme 3 in the C-SOBOM project and will also provide glider expertise to the research team.

Staff

Key, Robert
(609) 258-3595 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Research Oceanographer, Princeton University | C-SOBOM Data Coordinator
Interests Large-scale ocean circulation and global climate change, marine geochemistry and biogeochemistry
Biography

Robert M. Key, Research Oceanographer at Princeton University, has been heavily involved with large scale biogeochemical and tracer observation programs since 1980, including the U.S. sponsored Transient Tracers in the Ocean (TTO), South Atlantic Ventilation Experiment (SAVE), World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), Joint Ocean Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) and, most recently, Climate Variability and Predictability (CLIVAR) programs as well as the international North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES) and the European Union CarboOcean and CarboChange programs. He played a very active role in bothsample measurement and data organization, collection and analysis. Measurement activities included U/Th species during the 1980s, radiocarbon during the 1990s and 2000s, in collaboration with National Ocean Sciences Accelerator Mass Spectrometer facility at WHOI, and open ocean carbon system measurements during WOCE. As a data coordinator he led the effort to produce the first global scale open ocean database suitable for biogeochemical investigations (Global Ocean Data Analysis Project, GLODAP), the E.U. follow-up (Carbon in the North Atlantic, CARINA) and participated in the Japanese led PACIFICA construction. Current efforts include production of the next version of GLODAP. Research areas include anthropogenic carbon, large scale ocean circulation and ventilation, decadal climate change and biogeochemical investigations at large spacial scale.

Dr. Key will serve as data manager for this project and be directly involved in scientific data analysis with special emphasis on decadal scale biogeochemical change

McDonnell, Janice
(848) 932-3285 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
4-H Science Agent and Associate Professor, Department of 4-H Youth Development, Rutgers University | Education/Diversity/Outreach Manager, Theme 3 Co-Investigator
Interests Developing strategies for achieving high quality collaborations among scientists and educators to promote Ocean Literacy.
Biography

As 4-H Science Agent in the Department of 4-H Youth Development and Director of the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence Networked Ocean World, Janice McDonnell facilitates collaborations among scientists and formal and informal educators to create unique products and programs that promote Ocean Literacy.  Janice has played a key role in the development of curriculum that uses scientific data in innovative teaching contexts at Rutgers University for K-12 students. She also works on the connections between in and out of school science learning and has played an integral role in the evaluation of education programs.

Ms. McDonnell will serve as the Education and Diversity Coordinator for C-SOBOM and as a Co-Investigator for Theme 3.

International Collaborations Committee

Ansorge, Isabelle
+27 0 21 650-3277 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Senior Lecturer, Oceanography Department University of Cape Town
Interests Southern Ocean dynamics and ecosystem change at Subantarctic Islands
Biography

Isabelle Ansorge is a Senior Lecturer in the Oceanography Department at the University of Cape Town. Her research interests focus on the impact changes in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current have on Subantarctic Islands and in particular how such changes impact their ecosystem functioning. As the departmental observational oceanographer she is responsible for the hands-on sea going training of all postgraduate students and runs an annual "class-afloat" module for honours students. Dr. Ansorge is involved in a large number of international programmes and is currently the leading scientist on the SAMOC-SA (South Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation) programme. In addition over the past 4 years, she has been invited to join a number of national, international (IAPSO EC, SCAR, SCOR) and review panels (IPY, IYPE, SOOS) with the aim of improving Southern Africa’s visibility in the international scientific community. Membership in these various committees has provided her with a solid network base within both the national and international geophysical community and exposed her to current research activities. Her involvement at these meetings and workshops has been to advertise the work undertaken within the marine science community, identify cross institutional, multi-disciplinary research opportunities, build capacity, and nurture postgraduate students and emerging researchers on matters such as funding support to attend international conferences.

Claustre, Hervé
+33 4 93 76 37 29 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Senior Scientist, CNRS/Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche
Interests Variability of stocks and fluxes of matter in the upper ocean in the context of global change
Biography

Hervé Claustre is CNRS Senior Scientist at LOV. His research activities, largely dedicated to ocean observation, can be summarized as “To develop interdisciplinary approaches at the frontiers of marine biology, chemistry and optics for the study and understanding of biogeochemical processes, ranging from the small to the global scale, to address the variability of stocks and fluxes of matter in the upper ocean in the context of global change”. For more than a decade, Dr Claustre has pursued research of biogeochemical processes at presently unresolved scales or in poorly observed oceanic areas thanks to the development of new observational techniques based on gliders and profiling floats Hervé Claustre was the chairman of the IOCCG (International Ocean Color Coordinating Group) working group on “Bio-optical sensors on Argo floats” and is a member of the Argo Science Team and of the Scientific and Technical Advisory Group of the Euro-Argo program. He has published more than 100 papers since the beginning of his career. In 2010 he was awarded by the prestigious ERC-advanced grant (~$4 million) for the five-year project remOcean (remotely sensed biogeochemical cycles in the Ocean) essentially focused on biogeochemical floats research in various open ocean areas.

Dr. Claustre will serve as a member of international collaborations committee and will share his expertise and of his group on technological aspects, data analysis and outreach activities.

Gruber, Nicolas
+41 44 632 03 52 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Professor of Environmental Physics, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH) Zürich | ETH Zürich
Interests Biogeochemical cycles and their interaction with Earth's climate system
Biography

Nicolas Gruber has been Full Professor of Environmental Physics at the Department of Environmental System Sciences at ETH Zurich since July 2006.

Dr. Gruber's research interests are the study of biogeochemical cycles on regional to global scales and on timescales from months to millennia, with a particular focus on the interaction of these cycles with Earth's climate system. The goal is to better understand the physical, chemical and biological processes that control these cycles and to be able to make predictions for the future, especially with regard to the potential feedbacks between the global carbon cycle and a changing climate. His primary research tools are the interpretation and analysis of observational data coupled with the use of models ranging in complexity from simple box models to general circulation models.

Dr. Gruber, together with Jorge Sarmiento from Princeton University, is author of the textbook "Ocean Biogeochemical Dynamics". In recognition of his outstanding contribution to Marine Sciences, Dr. Gruber received the Rosenstiel Award from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences of the University of Miami in 2004. This year, he will become an AGU fellow.

Körtzinger, Arne
+49 431 600-4200 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Professor, GEOMAR/Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel
Interests Marine biogeochemistry its anthropogenic perturbation and the development of new approaches to autonomous ocean observation
Biography

Arne Kortzinger is a marine chemist at the Leibniz Institute of Marine Sciences, IFM-GEOMAR, Kiel. Prof. Körtzinger’s research focuses on the marine carbon cycle and its anthropogenic perturbation, the role of oxygen as a biogeochemical switch and sensitive indicator of global change in the ocean, and the development and application of new methods and sensors as well as approaches to autonomous ocean observation, such as profiling subsurface floats.

Meredith, Michael
+44-1223-221586 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Leader of Polar Oceans research program, British Antarctic Survey Chair of Southern Ocean Observing System, British Antarctic Survey
Interests Southern Ocean circulation and variability, and its role in the global climate system
Biography

Michael P. Meredith created and leads the Polar Oceans research program at the British Antarctic Survey, with overall responsibility for its design, funding and implementation. He is a member of the POGO (Partnership for Observations of the Global Ocean) organization and Chair for the Southern Ocean Observing System.

Dr. Meredith has worked extensively in both polar regions, with a particular focus on understanding the role of the ocean in climate change and variability. He has made notable contributions concerning the dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC), including assessments of how sensitive is its flow to climatic changes in forcing, and the implications of overturning circulation in the ACC for global climate. His work demonstrated the role of mesoscale eddies in modulating changes in the mean ACC flow, and progressed research concerning their impact on Southern Ocean warming and carbon uptake. He has also made extensive contributions to the study of global abyssal warming and its causes via changes in the formation and export of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). Dr. Meredith has strong interests in the use of emerging technology as part of ocean observing systems. He has conducted numerous field campaigns in the polar regions from both UK and international research vessels, including serving as Chief Scientist on 5 major cruises. He has authored more than 80 peer-reviewed journal papers on the physical and interdisciplinary science of the polar seas, and manages a program with a total annual budget in excess of £1M (GBP).

Piola, Alberto
54 11 4301-0061/67 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Research Director, Departamento Oceanografia, Servicio de Hidrografia Naval and Professor of Physical Oceanography, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina, Departamento Oceanografia
Interests Dynamics of ocean fronts and water masses and their impact on biogeochemical processes and primary productivity
Biography

Alberto Piola, a physical oceanographer,heads the Ocean Dynamics Section at Servicio de Hidrografia Naval and is a Professor of Physical Oceanography at Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina). He serves in the IMBER Scientific Steering Committee (IGBP/SCOR) and the Ocean Observation Panel for Climate (IOC/UNESCO). Has published on the large scale circulation of the Southern Ocean and the South Atlantic. His current research is focused on the physical processes leading to enhanced biological productivity and the impact of ocean circulation and fronts on the biota. He is interested in shelf-open ocean interactions and western boundary currents. Dr. Piola currently leads an international consortium sponsored by the Inter-American Institute on Global Change Research, the US National Science Foundation and a number of South American research foundations. Piola will participate in the analysis of observations in the South Atlantic.

Pizarro, Oscar
56-41-2203585 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Associate Professor, Universidad de Concepción
Interests Ocean circulation dynamics, eastern boundary current systems, upwelling and coastal ocean processes, equatorial dynamics and ENSO
Biography

Coming soon.

Rintoul, Steve
61-3-6232-5393 | E-mail | CV | Full Page
Fellow, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) | Chair, International Collaborations Committee
Interests Role of the Southern Ocean in the global ocean circulation, climate and biogeochemical cycles
Biography

Stephen R. Rintoul is a CSIRO Fellow at CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia.  He has broad interests in Southern Ocean research, including the dynamics of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, water mass formation and ventilation, and the coupling between physics, biology and chemistry. He uses a variety of observational tools to study the circulation of the Southern Ocean, including hydrographic transects, floats, moorings and satellites. He is a Coordinating Lead Author for the Oceans chapter of the IPCC 5th Assessment Report. Dr Rintoul has extensive experience in the leadership and coordination of international research programs in the Southern Ocean, having led the Southern Ocean component of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, the Climate Variability and Prediction program, and the International Polar Year. More recently, he has been the driving force behind the establishment of the Southern Ocean Observing System.

Dr Rintoul will Chair the Foreign Advisory Committee of C-SOBOM, lead the Australian contribution to the program, and participate in the analysis and interpretation of C-SOBOM data.

External Advisory Committee

Anderson, Robert
(845) 365-8508 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Ewing-Lamont Research Professor, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory | Chair, C-SOBOM Advisory Committee
Interests Interaction of physical, chemical and biological processes that regulate the exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the ocean.
Biography

Robert F. Anderson, Ewing-Lamont Research Professor, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, and Adjunct Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Columbia University, has studied the interactions between the physics, chemistry and biology of the present-day ocean to gain a better understanding of the combination of ocean processes that regulated the exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the deep sea under past climate conditions. His research on the processes that forced carbon dioxide exchange between the ocean and the atmosphere in the past has also revealed key features of the global system of ocean and atmospheric circulation that create the close coupling between climate and carbon dioxide that is observed in ice cores from Antarctica. His work supports the view that processes in the Southern Ocean govern the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the ocean and the atmosphere, thus giving him a close personal interest in the outcome of C-SOBOM. He played a leadership role in the scientific planning and implementation of the Joint Ocean Global Flux Study (JGOFS) of the 1990s, which examined biological responses to variability in the physical and chemical environment of a variety of oceanic regimes, and in the US Carbon Cycle Science Program of the 2000s. In the 2000's he also led the planning and implementation of GEOTRACES, an international program to study the marine biogeochemical cycles of trace elements and their isotopes. The main field program component of GEOTRACES is now underway and it is on track to become the largest international program to date to examine the chemistry of the ocean.

Dr. Anderson will serve as the chair of the external Advisory Committee for C-SOBOM.

Caldwell, Meg
(650) 723-4057 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Executive Director, Center for Ocean Solutions
Interests Environmental and natural resources law & policy
Biography

Meg Caldwell serves as the Executive Director for the Center for Ocean Solutions. She also directs the Environmental and Natural Resources Law & Policy Program at Stanford Law School, where her research and teaching focuses on the use of science in environmental and marine resource policy development and implementation as well as private and public incentives for natural resource conservation. She served on the California Coastal Commission from 2004-2007, including two years as its chairperson. While Chair of the Commission, Caldwell also served on the board of the California Coastal Conservancy.

Caldwell is a regular in Washington, D.C. and Sacramento alike, working with elected officials, ocean and coastal agencies and their stakeholders to tackle major challenges with practical approaches. She has testified in Congress regarding reauthorization of the National Marine Sanctuaries Act and the ecological and economic impacts of the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. She also served as a senior consultant to the National Commissions on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling, providing both oral testimony and written reports to the Commission on recommendations to reform federal oversight of offshore exploration and drilling.

From 2004 to 2011, she was a member of the California Marine Life Protection Act Blue Ribbon Task Force for the central, north central, south and north coasts. Her work with the Task Force helped the State of California establish the largest network of marine protected areas in the nation. Before joining the Stanford Law School faculty in 1994, Caldwell was an instructor at San Jose State University and the University of California, Davis Extension; counsel for MicroCLEAN, Inc.; a member of the City of Saratoga Planning Commission; and an associate in the environmental law group of McCutchen, Doyle, Brown & Enersen. She earned her B.S. in Business Administration (with an emphasis on economic analysis and policy) from the University of California at Berkeley and her JD from Stanford Law School.

Doney, Scott
| E-mail | -- | Full Page
Senior Scientist, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Interests His science interests span oceanography, climate and biogeochemistry, with particular emphasis on the application of numerical models and data analysis methods to global-scale questions.
Biography

Scott Doney is a Senior Scientist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Much of his research focuses on how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change, which may act to either damp or accelerate climate trends. A current area of interest is on ocean acidification due to the invasion into the ocean of carbon dioxide and other chemicals from fossil fuel burning. He has authored more than 190 peer-reviewed research publications and a textbook on data analysis and modeling methods for the marine sciences. He co-lead the U.S. JGOFS Synthesis and Modeling Program. He was the inaugural chair of the U.S. Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry (OCB) Program is currently on the steering committees for the Ocean Carbon and Biogeochemistry Program and the U.S. CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography Program and a convening lead author for the Oceans and Marine Resources chapter of the U.S. 2013 National Climate Assessment.

Rhines, Peter
206-543-0593 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Prof of Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Scientific Advisory Board
Interests Ocean circulation and climate, geophysical fluid dynamics to investigate climate mechanisms; global environmental education
Biography

Peter Rhines has for 4 decades studied the dynamics of ocean circulation and its complexity. Mesoscale eddies, Rossby waves in the ocean and their interaction with the atmosphere. High-latitude water-mass transformation with field work in the Labrador Sea, the dense overflows from the Arctic and turbulent mixing in high latitude fronts. Dynamics of atmospheric storm tracks. Seagoing work with the geochemical TTO and TAS programs, studying trace-chemical distributions which are analogs to the carbon cycle. Use of Seagliders in studying high-latitude ocean convection, mixing and circulation. Wind-driven ocean circulation and climate variability at high latitude, focused on the interaction of complex seafloor topography and circulation. Member, National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences; AGU Fellow, AMS Fellow.

Dr. Rhines serves on the Advisory Panel for C-SOBOM.

Spinrad, Richard
541-737-0664 | E-mail | -- | Full Page
Vice President for Research, Oregon State University
Interests
Biography

Dr. Richard W. (Rick) Spinrad became Vice President for Research at Oregon State University (OSU) in July of 2010. Prior to this role, he served as Assistant Administrator for research for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in Washington, D.C.

As NOAA’s Assistant Administrator for research, Spinrad directed the agency’s programs in oceanography, atmospheric science and climate from 2005-2010. He directly supervised several of NOAA’s high-profile research efforts, including ocean exploration, the National Sea Grant College Program and the Climate Program Office, as well as seven NOAA laboratories around the United States.

In addition to his NOAA stint, Spinrad has served as a research director with the U.S. Office of Naval Research, was the Technical Director for the Oceanographer of the Navy, taught at two universities (U.S. Naval Academy and George Mason University), directed a major national non-profit organization, presided over a private company and worked as a research scientist (with over 50 publications). Spinrad is the recipient of Presidential Rank Awards from Presidents George W. Bush and Barack H. Obama and the Distinguished Civilian Service Award from the Department of the Navy. He is a past President of The Oceanography Society and is a Fellow of three professional societies. Dr. Spinrad is an alumnus of The Johns Hopkins University and Oregon State University.